Nebula

Nebula

Let It Burn

Tee Pee

It’s hard to imagine what musical differences ousted Eddie Glass from Fu Manchu, because his new band is almost dead-on for his old band – acid-washed seventies rock, even down to the endearingly blunted Ace Frehley vocals and the like-wow-man vibe of the graphics and song titles (“Vulcan Bomber,” “Down The Highway,” “Raga In The Bloodshot Pyramid”). A good jam, if more than a little irrelevant in the face of Fu Manchu’s continued rockitude, to say nothing of Monster Magnet’s imminent return. Tee Pee Records, P.O. Box 20307, New York, NY 10009

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