The Linus Pauling Quartet

The Linus Pauling Quartet

Killing You With Rock

September Gurls

I think that it’s high time we as a Nation ended the practice of recycling old junior high school instruments by donating them to houses of the Criminally Insane. Because, if we don’t, more and more hopelessly violent lunatics like the Linus Pauling Quartet will record more albums. On the one hand, naming your band after a two-time Nobel Laureate and Vitamin C freak (now dead) has positive punk overtures; on the other, is such a thing appropriate when you have a song called “Beer, Women, and Sunflower Seeds,” and the music is recorded on a boombox and sounds like Frank Zappa outtakes?

The album appears to be divided into three distinct movements. The first movement, which I like to call the “bowel movement,” has four songs, most notably “Hendrix’s Boots” a fuzzy ditty about Jimi Hendrix, replete with blaring saxophone and insane guitar. The Second Movement, containing three songs and entitled “The Great Singularity (Part 1),” I refer to as the “anti-bowel movement movement,” and may possibly be the most significant work of experimental music of the year. The first song, “The Colour Out of Space,” is in fact, the H.P. Lovecraft story put to a blend of Black Sabbath jazz. “Interstellar Absolute Power Bootycall Explosion,” the second song of the movement, is, well, its title says it all. The third song, “Dance of the Bugpeople,” which was obviously influenced by two works of Edward Gorey (The Bug Book and The Insect God), is as close as one should ever get to seeing inside the mind of the insane.

The album’s third movement contains two more songs, “Insomnia” and “La Mort De ‘Les Amis’,” both of which are pretty disturbing, though nothing along the lines of “Dance of the Bugpeople,” which has given me nightmares.

Don’t bother trying to send for this CD, the label is in Germany, but the band’s in Texas; try e-mail instead. September Gurls; septembergurls@compuserve.com.

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