The Make-Up

The Make-Up

I Want Some

K

I Want Some compiles 23 tracks taken from out of print 7-inches and puts them on a single CD. As with any band that is ground-breaking, there is no one band or genre you can reference the Make Up with that could do them justice. Instead I’ll just mention a few of the many styles that have been used to describe their sound, such as R&B, garage rock, psychedelic, punk, and gospel music. Not one, nor all, of these styles come close to encompassing the way the Make-Up sounds, they only help explain the way they approach their music. A fitting reference would be old Motown soul, which is shown in everything from Ian Svenonius’ Smokey Robinson-esque vocals to the back-up singers. “Born on the Floor,” “Gray Motorcycle,” “Every Baby Cries the Same,” and “Free Arthur Lee!” are just a few of the songs that you can’t get out of your head after the first listen. The other songs become more and more infectious until finally the whole album is stuck in your head (which isn’t a bad thing.) I listened to this CD all the way through at least a dozen times within the first few days I had it. If you’re into soul music, meaning the kind of music that comes from the soul, not mearly a style, then you need to go and get this now. Trust me, you won’t be disappointed. The Make-Up reaffirm my faith in the future of music and the belief their are still people making music for the love of it, not just the money.

K Records, PO Box 7154, Olympia, WA 980507

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