Superscope

Superscope

Girls Smile/Girls Talk

Zip

Although it appears that they have broken up, on this release, Superscope crafts wickedly catchy pop music. Capturing the hooks and harmonies of Big Star, this three-song single has a way of sinking into your consciousness. The opening track reminds me of early Who (I don’t know why), while the second track merges the better elements of sixties and seventies pop. For the connoisseurs of indie-pop, do not let Superscope escape you.

Zip Records, 116 New Montgomery Street, Suite 200, San Francisco, CA 94105; ziprecords@earthlink.net

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