The D4

The D4

6TWENTY

Hollywood

The D4 is supposedly the next “savior of rock.” The hype machine behind them is incredibly powerful and overwhelming, so watch yourself! I guess that you could say The D4 plays aggressive garage rock, but that would be too simple a description; it’s more like an authentic type of blues-based punk rock than anything else. People will try to stick 6TWENTY in the same category as The Strokes. That would be a mistake, as The Strokes cannot hold a candle to what The D4 have done on this record.

This is one of the most purely energetic records I have heard in years. Many bands can fake energy on an album (e.g. AFI, At The Drive In), but rarely does it actually come off as authentic. The D4 seem to attack their instruments with fury and passion, making this collection of rockers instantly enjoyable. From the title and aggression of the album’s first track, “Rock & Roll, Motherfucker,” they announce their presence with both authority and pomp.

In terms of the actual sound of the album, the guitars are really grainy, giving what is a major label release a somewhat lo-fi feel. The vocalist is a total spazz, and he kind of reminds me of Ian Svenonius of The Make-Up, not in sound, but in attitude. I would have liked to have heard the drums up in the mix, but the level they are at is acceptable; it might have destroyed me had the drums been perfect, too.

What I’m trying to say is that the hype machine behind this one is warranted: these guys are really good. Many of you will already have this album when you read this review. Those of you who don’t, I can’t think of a better summer record to which to rock out. This is a superb piece of rock.

Hollywood Records: http://hollywoodrecords.go.com/ • The D4: http://www.thed4.net/

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked with *

Cancel reply

Recently on Ink 19...

  • Comin’ At Ya!
    Comin’ At Ya!

    The Blu-ray reissue of Comin’ At Ya, a 1981 3D Spaghetti Western movie falls flat.

  • Bobby Rush
    Bobby Rush

    Chicken Heads: A 50-Year History of Bobby Rush ( Omnivore Recordings). Review by James Mann.

  • Geezër
    Geezër

    Geezër brought their old-school show all the way from their Miami rest home, and Julius C. Lacking thinks they were quite spry.

  • Bully
    Bully

    Bully greets Orlando with apathy and anger toward one of its theme parks. Jen Cray smiles and thinks, “Man, this band would have fit in well in the nineties!”

  • The Pop Group
    The Pop Group

    For How Much Longer Do We Tolerate Mass Murder. Review by Bob Pomeroy.

  • Luther Dickinson
    Luther Dickinson

    Blues & Ballads: A Folksinger’s Songbook: Volumes I & II (New West Records). Review by James Mann.

  • Conway
    Conway

    Big Talk EP (Self-Released). Review by Jen Cray.

  • Freakwater
    Freakwater

    Scheherazade (Bloodshot Records). Review by James Mann.

  • The Haymarket Squares
    The Haymarket Squares

    Light It Up. Review by Carl F Gauze.

  • Ani DiFranco
    Ani DiFranco

    Years pass, and so do our legends, but one constant remains: there are always artists living and breathing that are worth your time and attention. Ani DiFranco is a major one, according to Jen Cray and a whole legion of fans.

From the Archives