The See

The See

The See

Pretending and Ending

Little Rock, eh? It’s not a hot bed of rock and roll like Gainesville or Detroit, but when it pops out a band, you ought to sit up and listen. These four guys like wearing striped shirts and pounding out spirited indie rock that hews close to the classic guitar and drum sound with an occasional keyboard riff. It’s their versatile songwriting that makes them jump off the turntable. Check out the quiet love song “Head Like a Stone,” the power rocker “Lights,” and a gospel influenced “Old Souls.”

A guy named Joe Yoder does the heavy singing. His clear voice lets you know what he’s singing and the effort in his lyrics, and he’s worth the listen all by himself. Behind him is some fancy guitar and bass work by Eric Morris and Dylan Yelenich, all perched on a consistent drum kit driven by Tyler Nance. Sometimes these guys pull out all the indie stops with the overdriven guitars, and sometimes they fall back to the Americana influences of modernized folk songs and ballads that point northeast toward Nashville. Their favorite topic is love; I suppose they see injustice in the world but sometimes all you want to do is cry in your beer over the injustice of hormones gone astray.

These guys may well have a label in their future, but for now they are unsigned and fancy free. Are they worth the trip to Little Rock? I think so. The few times I’ve been there it’s been a fun place, and The See can only make it better.

The See: wearethesee.com

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