Music Reviews

Atom and His Package

A Society of People Named Elihu

Mountain/Suzuki Beane

When writing a review, it’s usually a good idea to be able to describe what you’re reviewing. Yet in this instance, it’s nearly an impossible task. A Society of People Named Elihu, the second release from Atom and His Package, has left me speechless. But alas, I’ll make an attempt: for starters, if anyone isn’t speechless, it’s Atom. His lyrics are truly what makes this album so unique, as he sings about anything from fat goaltenders in “Goalie” to his awful high-school years in “Punk Rock Academy.” Songs are anything but serious, and it’s nearly impossible not to burst out laughing as Atom sings something like “What do you call a spoon that’s like a spoon but it’s flat?” His amazing creativity, insane wit, and incredible sense of humor make this lyrically one of the most incredible albums to date.

But what of the music? This is no “listen once, laugh, and lend to your friend for the rest of your life” albums. Oh no! The songs are actually very catchy, and if you’re not careful, you’re liable to walk around singing things like “Put an Oreo in my portfolio” all day. The music isn’t made with any of your conservative instruments. Rather, Atom uses a sequencer (hence, the “package”) to program in what I can only call “rock-n-roll circus music” – bleeps, blips, pseudo-chords, and drum machines. But don’t let that discourage you. Atom is truly the full package. Mountain/Suzuki Beane, P.O. Box 220320, Greenpoint PO, Brooklyn, NY 11222-9997


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