Smartbomb CA

Smartbomb CA

Smartbomb CA

Creative Man

Fast, fun, furious pop punk, not quite in the same rut as the Fat Wrepitaph crowd, more akin to a cleaned-up Husker Du kind of sound. Not much else to say, really… it’s good, though it’s nothing spectacular. Lots of fast rockin’ tunes that sort of blur together after a while – really reminiscent of Dogrocket, from Columbus, only not quite as memorable. Um… that’s really it. What else can I say? They rock. Thank you. Good night. Creative Man Disc, 1875 Century Park East, #1165, Los Angeles, CA 90067

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