Screen Reviews

Heinous Bienfäng

Satan’s Camaro

Bullsitter

Bringing meaning to the word “multimedia,” this release from Bullsitter appears at first to be a comic book, but actually contains an enhanced audio CD, a 16-page “program guide” and a couple of postcards and stickers. The music on the disc is essentially four versions of “Satan’s Camaro,” a song that in its original form (included) is barely over a minute long. The other versions include a remix (by Q-Burns Abstract Message, no less), an instrumental, and the soundtrack to centerpiece of the whole affair, the “Satan’s Camaro” film.

The short is a well-done ten-minute original with an interesting and menacingly vague plot. Accompanying the film are some great graphics and a couple of shorter sidetracks with strange (and somewhat disturbing) images.

Overall, this is a great package, providing entertainment at all sorts of levels. As the technology for putting things like these together becomes cheaper and more accessible, more and more bands will be able to easily produce generic multimedia projects. It’s good to see someone pushing the envelope and doing it with this much style. Bullsitter Records, 4340 N. Park Dr., Tucker, GA 30084; http://www.heinous.com


Recently on Ink 19...

Greg Hoy

Greg Hoy

Interviews

Fascinated by the arcane world of musical gear, Randy Radic spoke with dyed-in-the-wool gearhead Greg Hoy about his setup on new EP Holy Mother of God, how he produces his unique sound, and a gear-gone-wrong moment.

Joe Jackson

Joe Jackson

Event Reviews

Joe Jackson brought his Two Rounds of Racket tour to the Lincoln Theatre in Washington D.C. on Monday. Bob Pomeroy was in the area and caught the show.

Matías Meyer

Matías Meyer

Interviews

With only a week to go before powerful new feature Louis Riel or Heaven Touches The Earth premieres in the Main Slate at UNAM International Film Festival, Lily and Generoso sat down for an in-depth conversation with the film’s director, Matías Meyer.

Mostly True

Mostly True

Print Reviews

Carl F. Gauze reviews the fascinating Mostly True: The West’s Most Popular Hobo Graffiti Magazine, a chronicle of forgotten outsider subculture.