Sleater-Kinney

Sleater-Kinney

with Versus

Howling Wolf, New Orleans, LA • March 13, 1999

I had waited quite some time to see Sleater-Kinney. I guess I was interested in seeing them since Azalia Snail inadvertently turned me on to them. I grew to love the band’s music and the songs of Corin Tucker’s first band, Heavens to Betsy. But when you live in the Southeast and the band you like is in the Northwest, it’s not real easy to see them. I missed a couple of opportunities before, so when they were hitting the Big Easy, I was there. Jammed into the hot confines of Howling Wolf, I patiently stood through a tight set by the New York City band Versus. I had seen them before — they always put on a good show and are hardly opening act material. But the crowd was there for the girls from Olympia. It was an older crowd, no angry high school girls in sight, which was probably a good thing based on what was about to happen.

Sleater-Kinney hit the stage and started playing with a sound much richer and cleaner than I had expected. Corin Tucker on one side of the Wolf’s big stage, with Carrie Brownstein at the other, and Janet Weiss on drums, erasing the memory of Riot Grrrl icon Toni Goggin. After the first song there was a pause as Corin Tucker talked to the crowd in an attempt to cover Janet Weiss’ drum kit adjustments. She was sweet and jovial, a far cry from the picture many ‘zine writers have painted of her. They went back with a terrific rendition of “Little Babies” and another song, followed by drum repairs. During this interlude, Tucker informed the crowd that Carrie had hurt her back and the set might be short. Sleater-Kinney launched into another song. At the song’s conclusion, they walked off stage. After a few uncomfortable moments, Corin Tucker strode to the mic and announced Carrie couldn’t go on.

Apart from a few murmurings of “rip-off,” the large, hot crowd was mostly supportive. “I hope she’s all right,” was a common lament. People were jamming the band’s merchandise table and trying to decide where to go next. Frankly, I thought a good old-fashioned riot was in order. Burn down half the Warehouse district. I mean, they were once Riot Grrrlz!

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked with *

Recently on Ink 19...

  • Best of Film 2021
    Best of Film 2021

    Lily and Generoso select and review their ten favorite features, seven supplemental films, and two prized repertory releases of 2021.

  • I Saw A Dozen Faces…
    I Saw A Dozen Faces…

    From The Windbreakers to Bark, Tim Lee is a trooper in the rock and roll trenches…and he’s lived to tell it all in his new memoir.

  • The Lyons
    The Lyons

    A man on his deathbed is surrounded by bickering family members, many of which you would strangle him given the chance. In other words: a brilliant comedy!

  • The Reading Room
    The Reading Room

    Today’s episode features author Anna-Marie O’Brien talking about her book Adventures of a Metalhead Librarian: A Rock N’ Roll Memoir with Ink 19’s Rose Petralia.

  • Bush Tetras
    Bush Tetras

    Rhythm and Paranoia (Wharf Cat). Review by Scott Adams.

  • Tom Tom Club
    Tom Tom Club

    The Good The Bad and the Funky (Nacional). Review by Julius C. Lacking.

  • Barnes & Barnes
    Barnes & Barnes

    Pancake Dream (Demented Punk Records). Review by Carl F. Gauze.

  • Jeremiah Lockwood
    Jeremiah Lockwood

    A Great Miracle: Jeremiah Lockwood’s Guitar Soli Chanukah Album (Reboot). Review by Bob Pomeroy.

  • Metallica: The $24.95 Book
    Metallica: The $24.95 Book

    From an underground band that pioneered the thrash metal sound, to arguably the biggest rock act in the new millennium, Metallica has had a long and tumultuous history. Ben Apatoff scours a myriad of sources to catalog this history in his new book.

  • Araceli Lemos
    Araceli Lemos

    Shortly after AFI Fest 2021 wrapped, Generoso spoke at length with director, Araceli Lemos about her award-winning and potent feature debut, Holy Emy. Lemos’s film uses elements of body horror in her story about the exoticization of two Filipina sisters living in Greece and how that exploitation creates a distance between them.

From the Archives