Music Reviews

Holly Golightly

God Don’t Like It

Damaged Goods

It’s late, where the hell is Buddy? The Crickets are more than just annoyed, they’re pissed. The pitchers of beer, which they usually reserve to cool down after the show, have been flowing for a couple of hours. Where the hell is Buddy?

Deciding that the paying customers deserve something for their money, the band takes the stage and proceeds to drain their anger on stage, taking it out on their instruments in a manner that would shut down a sock hop in less time than it takes to remove your shoes. This may be the dawn of rock and roll, but this sounds just a bit too wild. From the audience, a jilted fan emerges, willing to provide vocals in place of her missing idol. Her voice is raw, a bit flat, but she makes up for it in attitude, an in-yer-face honesty that says you had better treasure that vulnerability of hers, because if you don’t, you can consider your ass kicked.

The riffs behind Miss Golightly may sound a bit antiquated in this modern age, but her wisdom and delivery provide plenty of contemporary complexity. “Give Back Time” asks for a refund on the efforts of a useless relationship and “Nothing You Can Say” is full of deliciously grim finality. The closing “Use Me,” a cover, lets you know who really has the upper hand. A thick, juicy slab of a record.

Damaged Goods, P.O. Box 671, London, England E17 6NF; http://www.damagedgoods.co.uk


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