Music Reviews

Spring Heel Jack

Disappeared

Thirsty Ear

Now some time back, we had a nice little scuffle between Spring Heel Jack and another, now known as Spring Heeled Jack USA. So hopefully that will keep you straight for this. The previous two releases I’ve heard from these guys have been heavily drum and bass, and heavy on “abstractions,” I guess. This time around, we have a rather interesting sound. We have a very solid element of “liveness” to the album as a whole. It sounds more like there is a stage covered in musicians just letting loose in a jam. If this is the direction they are going now, I am seriously going to add them to my list of “must sees.” Some critics really hated the difference between the two Death In Vegas releases, and I’m catching a very similar transition with Spring Heel Jack. So it leaves me wondering what will others think of it. It’s got the muscle to rough up the competition. It still has a very heavy drum and bass feel to it, but it’s a much “darker” sound, and best compared to Phylr or We. I’m rather partial to a heavier sound, for some reason, but one with a wide range of heaviness. Spring Heel Jack is hopefully setting the stage for something amazing in the coming months. At least I can always hope.

Thirsty Ear Recordings, 274 Madison Ave., Suite 804, New York, NY 10016; http://www.thirstyear.com


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