Music Reviews

Deckard

stereodreamscene

Reprise

After an inauspicious start with a track slightly too reminiscent of the Smashing Pumpkins, this disc quickly gains steam and demonstrates that Deckard is a band with a promise and capable of their own sound and vision. Although musically reminiscent of Radiohead’s first album, this album actually reminds me more of Gay Dad’s last album. Both bands share the ability to draw upon various sounds and styles of their predecessors and create something quite good. However, what sets this band apart from other nameless and faceless competitors is their clever embrace of keyboards and swathes of sound. This allows them to tread a thin line between being retro and modern. For example, the fifth track has a melody that is at once a mixture of Abba and Blondie, whereas on the opening track and others (“Conversation”) they exude a swaggering, glam rock attitude. In the meantime, other tracks display a strong lyric sensibility and ability to define characters. The track “Christine” is, next to “Lady Godiva’s Operation,” one of the finest songs I’ve heard about a sex change operation. Overall, this would certainly appeal to a wide audience.

http://www.reprise.com; http://www.deckardonline.com


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