Music Reviews

Dirty Walt and the Columbus Sanatation

To Put it Bluntly

Triple X

Walt and his “sanatation” crew really put together a funk album full of shit. Their basic message is this: don’t trust the government, don’t mess with Walt, and smoke your share of weed. While it’s true that George Clinton and the P-Funks were never really subtle with their drug references, Dirty Walt manages to make it seem like George Clinton was a straight-edger. The sleeve shows Walt in his room surrounded by a cloud of smoke, with what looks like a pound of weed laid out in front of him. Naturally, he’s wearing a High Times shirt and holding a jug of moonshine. The music is just as comical. It’s your normal funk sound, though a little on the plain side. The comedy comes in hits such as “Don’t Call That Man a Pussy,” when Walt threatens to “beat you like my little son” if you call that man a pussy. In fact, if you like funk, the album might actually be worth it just for its comedy value. There are ten highly suggestive songs rolled into one CD and packed full of humorous lyrics. But honestly, were they too high to remember how to spell sanitation?

Triple X Records, P.O. Box 862529, Los Angeles, CA 90086; http://www.triple-x.com


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