Music Reviews

Whocares?

Comments From the Peanut Gallery

Li’l Bit

One has to be pretty brave to name a band “Whocares?” It practically invites mean-spirited rock critic types to send in sarcastic two-word phrases in lieu of proper reviews (you know what I mean: “Not me,” “No one,” etc.).

Being that these boyos are from the home of Ink 19 corporate offices right here in Melbourne, that I’m hardly a rock critic type (much less a mean-spirited one), and most importantly, that Whocares? is actually a good band, you’ll get a proper review instead. The brothers Little (I don’t know whether the quartet are all actually brothers or whether they just took the name “Little” in a show of unity of self-effacement – either way, it’s pretty cool) walk that line between emo and pop-punk that a lot of bands are treading nowadays: two guitars and a rhythm section, mostly distortion and mostly major chords, but sometimes a short, pedal-less interlude for that emo tip. The guitars frequently play repetitive lines independently of each other and of the chord changes, typically staying on the same one or two strings and going up and down the neck rather than jumping to other strings to hit other notes. Think someone like Hot Rod Circuit and you’re in the ballpark. Lyrically, a lot of achingly earnest non-rhyming stuff. Plus one arguably gratuitous song accompanied only by two acoustics.

Li’l Bit Records, 904 Whitmire Dr., Melbourne, FL 32935, http://www.whocaresmusic.com


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