Music Reviews

Buckfast Superbee

You Know How the Song Goes

Walking

The epitome of a garage band, Buckfast Superbee’s first album, You Know How the Song Goes, is energetic, intelligent, and a joy to listen to. Peppy (in a very non-annoying way) songs and crunchy guitars riffs make this album an original variation of an ever-popular musical style. Songs like the wanna-be super character inspired “Mushman” and slower meaningful songs like “Panhandler” fill in the gaps that some of the less polished songs leave. The vocalist does an amazing thing with his sound throughout the album that I didn’t notice at first. His voice changes from song to song, just slightly, but it leaves the taste of other artists, making the songs he’s changed on, stick out in your head. On “First of a Thousand,” he sounds like Gavin Rossdale, “4 Minutes From Here” reminds me of a Foo Fighters tune, and in some of the slower songs, he croons like a young Kurt Cobain. Perhaps the best thing about You Know How the Song Goes is that it’s like getting a few albums in one, and you know that if the music is good, that’s always a nice surprise.

Walking Records, PO Box 49916, Los Angeles, CA 90049, http://www.walkingrecords.com, http://www.buckfastsuperbee.net


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