Music Reviews

The Silos

Laser Beam Next Door

Checkered Past

I don’t know what this album is doing on a small, indie label. This album has super hits written all over it. From the opening track, “Satisfied,” with its straight out rock beat that hearkens back to The Stones (when they mattered), to the next track “Drunken Moon,” on which the music has a good groove evocative of Los Lobos or The Latin Playboys. Opening with a swirling Wurlitzer, the song evokes the swinging elements of New Orleans, a reflection of the singer’s lyrics. In fact throughout this disc, the songs incorporate rhythm and catchy hooks to a greater extent than many discs in recent memory. Eschewing the hobbyhorses of indie rock, the album rocks and grooves to songs that are well written, sung and performed. I especially enjoy the lead singer’s voice, with its slightly world-weary conviction. Throughout the disc, he conveys the right sense of emotion to drive the songs home. A particular representation is the song “Four on the Floor,” a song that at times reminds me of Morphine. This is a great album, perfect for casual listening or to get the party going.

Checkered Past Records, 855 West Roscoe, Chicago, IL 60657; http://www.checkeredpast.com


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