Music Reviews

DB

10

Breakbeat Science

Those of you drum n’ bass addicts out there who are familiar with British/New Yorker DJ/producer/record store owner, DB have probably figured out from the title that this is the man’s tenth mixed CD (in eight years, actually). This one’s a bit more dancefloor-oriented than some of the others in the past, and you can feel it. Structured just like a closing set, DB takes you up the dancefloor mountain, which ends in an enjoyable, yet exhausted, plateau.

The climb doesn’t really begin until the third track, Teebee vs. Future Prophecies’ “Dimensional Entity” (which is a cover of an old Roberta Flack tune). The brilliant “Make It Tonight” by High Contrast gets everything thumping and is followed by some nice scorches by Kosheen, Third Rail, Influx Datum, and a Goldie remix of a Nasty Habits cut. By this time, things really can’t get any better, and the high quality of d n’ b frenzy continues. But it’s really the middle of 10 that grabs your attention. If your living room were a club, you’d be at the bar by the eleventh track, sweat-drenched, nodding your head to the beat, and wondering who the hell brought the glow sticks.

Breakbeat Science Recordings: http://www.breakbeatscience.com


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