mclusky

mclusky

mclusky do dallas

Too Pure

Let’s pretend your wallet-chain is functional

Almost too quotable for its own good, this is an album of frantic, literate punk from Cardiff, UK’s mclusky, blending hardcore aggression with eccentric pop, personal politics with plain hilarity, on what is ultimately a mad and insane disc and one of this year’s biggest and best surprises yet.

We take more drugs than a touring funk band. Sing it!

Poised somewhere between the aggro-disco of Public Image Limited, the sing-along-core of At the Drive-In, The Pixies’ angular pop and contemporary madmen Liars, mclusky look set to challenge and redefine what modern-day punk is all about. Twisted and furious, the songs on here are not as much performed as they are chanted, kicked and beaten into form by these three Welsh maniacs and resident superstar producer Steve Albini. Song titles include “Lightsabre Cocksucking Blues” and “The World Loves Us and is Our Bitch,” which should be more than enough to convince anyone that this album is nothing but pure brilliance incarnated.

One of those bands got paid I heard. One of those bands got fake tits

Abrasive and driven, mclusky defies categorization and mere comprehension, marking out a territory of their own in the process. This album drags punk rock back to the streets from which it came, instilling a new-found sense of fury and passion and danger and fun in it. An incessantly entertaining and dead serious album that pushes the envelope only to reclaim its self and what it’s all about. And you can dance to it too, although only in a jerky, weird way. Stunning.

Too Pure Recordings: http://www.toopure.com

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