Stereotyp

Stereotyp

My Sound

G-Stone

Well, in all honesty, the sound that comes out of Vienna’s Stefan Moerth (y’know, Stereotyp) is exactly the kind of music that enthralls and enervates music critics. For the lazy among my kin, My Sound saps their very being — for there’s no ready-made description for this disc, and they have to actually think about what to say. For those prosaic poets who heap superlatives upon their reviews like crap in a sewer, this is the perfect opportunity to coin that phrase. Hopefully being somewhere in between the two schools of reviewing, I’ll simply try to be honest.

Moerth has crafted a truly unique and promising debut, which may very well be one of the best albums of the year. The Austrian’s tastes and influences are as far-flung as Britain’s holdings in the beginning of the last century. Dub, dancehall, nu jazz, break beat, and R&B all captivate Moerth, and he combines everything into a beautiful mosaic of extraordinary sound — all with a smoky menace that truly haunts each track.

One can’t help grinding to the manic broken beat of “Jahman” with Tikiman’s mesmerizing cadence. “Fling” is absolutely bewitching. Cesar appears to lend his exemplary vocals to the bizarrely broken R&B of “Don’t Funk with Me.” Hubert Tubbs combines with Moerth on “Tell Me,” which sounds like the tortured souls of Sam And Dave being resurrected through a demented Phillip K. Dick novel. Then there’s the post-apocalyptic dancehall of “All Di Gal Com” with Collage that has you envisioning a gritty bump-and-grind with a girl in a contamination suit.

Three’s a real film noir pall cast over this project. A menacing tension that captivates the soul. My Sound is a truly unique musical adventure that marries incredibly disparate influences into a cohesive whole that leaves one baffled, enthralled, and craving more.

G-Stone: http://www.g-stoned.com • !K7: http://www.k7.com

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