Music Reviews

Anchor / Breakdance Vietnam

Anchor Vs. Breakdance Vietnam

Triple Crown

A slightly weird combination of forces from Triple Crown’s ever-so-varied artist roster, mixing one part gritty punk and one part fine emo. United, if nothing else, by their Christianity – the kind of Christianity that produces songs called “Don’t Let the Door Hit Ya Where the Good Lord Split Ya” (Breakdance Vietnam).

Anchor are first out, with four muddily produced songs of semi-formulaic punk rock, pretty brilliantly executed. “I Don’t Need Your” is a great piece of melodic punk, while “In The Air” is pure, unadulterated skate-punk – the kind of song that you’ve probably heard a billion times before but that still works wonders. And then they close their set with a great, snotty version of Skid Row’s “Youth Gone Wild.” Hurrah!

Breakdance Vietnam, meanwhile, come across like a punkier, snappier Elliott. It’s emo-ish pop-punk with melodies to kill for – just check “Wide Open” and the brilliant “What Wasn’t Said.” Shimmering emo punk that stands out in a crowd – you don’t get a lot of that these days. Breakdance Vietnam are worth checking out on this or any other release.

Triple Crown Records: http://www.triplecrownrecords.com


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