Music Reviews

Kristofer Aström & Hidden Truck

Plastered Confessions

Simba

One of Sweden’s prime singer-songwriters, Aström divides his time between his solo career and fronting punk rockers Fireside. Not that you’d be able to tell from his solo achievements, which are very calm affairs – music for broken-hearted lovers and those autumnal melancholic moments.

This six-track EP, targeting an uninitiated American audience, draws from his three solo albums and adds a previously unreleased Steve Earle cover (“Another Town”) to boost. Those already familiar with Aström will want it for the unreleased song, but everyone just mildly curious are well advised to check it out.

Aström’s casual, underachieving delivery belies his grand scope, as does his apparently stitched-together lyrics. “Don’t leave me / Stay for a while / I wanna show you how I really am.” Aström has the ability to make words like these seem all-important and profound, to have them carry a meaning way beyond the actual weight of the words. And the same holds true for his music – straightforwardly presented, but with a tone of real anguish and tired frustrations running throughout. No wonder he needs that alternative punk rock outlet of his.

Simba Recordings: http://www.simbarecordings.com/


Recently on Ink 19...

New Music Now 008: doubleVee

New Music Now 008: doubleVee

Features

Join Ink 19 with Barb and Allan Vest for new music from Sydney, Australia band Bloods, Prey composer Sarah Schachner, and doubleVee’s own latest release, Treat Her Strangely. What was your first cassette tape, hmm?

Hold Me Tight

Hold Me Tight

Screen Reviews

Lily and Generoso review Hold Me Tight, the sixth feature directed by renowned actor Mathieu Amalric. Centered around a brilliant performance from Vicky Krieps (Phantom Thread, Bergman Island), Hold Me Tight is an unpredictable and remarkable psychological drama.

Sirens

Sirens

Screen Reviews

The fact that the band Slaves to Sirens exists is impressive, but that they live, love, and breathe to play metal takes things to another level. Sirens documents the journey. Review by Charles DJ Deppner.