Music Reviews

Jeff Ott

Will Work For Diapers

Subcity

Nothing like folk music to push your politics – the music is slow and unobtrusive, and there’s no strong hook to block your well thought out message. This two CD set speaks a manifesto for the Ruckus Society, which provides activists with whatever resources it can scrounge up. Of course, like all political groups, you have to be the right flavor of activist to get support. But that’s not atypical. The songs here cover a long list of topics, mostly very current: The Gulf War, 9-11, stop using oil and plastics. Interspersed are some old standards: feminism, don’t pay your evil landlord rent, feed the poor. All these songs are reasonably well played and to the point, even if they all sound pretty much the same.

This isn’t an album about music so much as one about changing the world. If you like the manifesto, you’ll love the soundtrack, and if you don’t buy the program, it’s reasonably offensive. Imagine an acoustic guitar played out of a van covered with stickers and spewing oil smoke – the driver means well, but probably isn’t accomplishing what he wants. That’s the joy of idealism; you can practice a religion without all those tedious voters meetings.

Subcity Records: http://www.subcity.net/ • Ruckus Society: http://www.ruckus.org/


Recently on Ink 19...

New Music Now 008: doubleVee

New Music Now 008: doubleVee

Features

Join Ink 19 with Barb and Allan Vest for new music from Sydney, Australia band Bloods, Prey composer Sarah Schachner, and doubleVee’s own latest release, Treat Her Strangely. What was your first cassette tape, hmm?

Hold Me Tight

Hold Me Tight

Screen Reviews

Lily and Generoso review Hold Me Tight, the sixth feature directed by renowned actor Mathieu Amalric. Centered around a brilliant performance from Vicky Krieps (Phantom Thread, Bergman Island), Hold Me Tight is an unpredictable and remarkable psychological drama.

Sirens

Sirens

Screen Reviews

The fact that the band Slaves to Sirens exists is impressive, but that they live, love, and breathe to play metal takes things to another level. Sirens documents the journey. Review by Charles DJ Deppner.