Music Reviews
The Elected

The Elected

Me First

Sub Pop

The first thirty seconds of this disc may lead you to believe you’re in for a Grandaddy sort of experience, and you’d be partly right. The Elected have that low-key rural charm thing down pat. They also are not a-feard of using new-fangled gadgetry to enhance their rustic songwriting, which comes across mostly through a sort of low-key country strum, glittering with well-placed pedal steel guitar. The vocals are sometimes close to a whispered croon, by songwriter/vocalist/guitarist Blake Sennett (also of Rilo Kiley). While The Elected may lose some points for the similarities to another band, there’s far worse wells from which to drink. And overall, Me First retains its individuality and provides some refreshing listening for those who (like me) have been completely bewitched by Grandaddy time and again.

Supremely cohesive, Me First is one of those albums that fully develops over time and repeated listenings. There are plenty of melodic hooks to get you started, reel you in and get you to pay close attention. Those snatches of lyrics begin evolving, connecting, hanging together as if they were all part of the same song. I’d have to say that ultimately your interpretation will vary. To this critic, Me First sounds like dusty sunlight slanting through a banging trailer home screen door. There’s a strong wistfulness, a feeling of childhood lost and something else gained and the question of whether it was all a fair deal. Have a listen and see what you think.

The Elected: http://www.theelected.com/ • Sub Pop: http://www.subpop.com/


Recently on Ink 19...

Garage Sale Vinyl: KISS, The Solo Albums

Garage Sale Vinyl: KISS, The Solo Albums

Garage Sale Vinyl

This week, cuddly curmudgeon Christopher Long finds himself feeling even older as he hobbles through a Florida flea market in pursuit of vinyl copies of the four infamous KISS solo albums — just in time to commemorate the set’s milestone 45th anniversary.

Borsalino

Borsalino

Screen Reviews

Starting with small-time jobs, two gangsters take over all the crime in Marseilles in this well-paced and entertaining French film. Carl F. Gauze reviews the freshly released Arrow Video Blu-ray edition of Borsalino (1970).

Weird Science

Weird Science

Screen Reviews

Two teenage boys build a sexy computer girlfriend with an 8-bit computer… you know the story. Carl F. Gauze reviews Weird Science (1985), in a new 4K UHD Blu-ray release from Arrow Films.

City of the Living Dead

City of the Living Dead

Screen Reviews

Cauldron Films’ new UHD/Blu-ray release of Lucio Fulci’s City of the Living Dead (1980) preserves one of the best Italian horror films, according to Phil Bailey.

Broken Mirrors

Broken Mirrors

Screen Reviews

Marleen Gorris’s first theatrical feature is a potent feminist look at the easily disposable lives of sex workers in Amsterdam. Phil Bailey reviews Broken Mirrors.

%d bloggers like this: