Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man’s Chest

Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man’s Chest

Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man’s Chest

directed by Gore Verbinski

starring Johnny Depp, Orlando Bloom, Keira Knightley

Walt Disney Pictures

Arrrr, a sequel! The cast of the 2003 blockbuster, Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl, is back, ready to conquer the seas. But alas! Captain Davy Jones, of the legendary Flying Dutchman, is after the infamous Captain Jack Sparrow (played by Johnny Depp) for a debt owed to him–and he won’t take no for an answer. Either the debt is repayed, or else it’s an eternity of servitude for the Captain of the Black Pearl. Whatever is Sparrow to do? Why, entangle his good old friends, Will Turner (Orlando Bloom) and Elizabeth Swann (Keira Knightley) into the action!

Before you cast this aside as just a sequel (ooh what a dirty word), there are some things to keep in mind. This movie has a lot to live up to, and it does a pretty damn good job. It’s one of the best sequels I’ve seen, though the two-and-a-half hour movie did have its slow moments. However, this is an epic story, bursting with action, suspense and romance, among other things. It will have you on the edge of your seats, with a suprising ending that leaves you no choice but to wait patiently for the third installment (due out next summer).

Director Gore Verbinski did an amazing job. The filming is magnificent, especially with difficult scenes like shooting the swordfight on the 18-foot wheel or any of the fighting sequences on the boats. The special effects will leave you in awe, and the make-up will have you flabbergasted. Kudos to the make-up crew for the amazing work, especially on the crew of The Flying Dutchman

As for the acting, let’s start off with the Captain, shall we? Johnny Depp is back in his first-ever recurring role. Sparrow is still as flamboyant and quirky as ever. If you’re looking for Depp’s best performance- well sorry, dear friends, but this isn’t it. He still does a fine job, but something in this movie almmost makes me start to dislike Sparrow as a character. Let’s move on to the dashing Orlando Bloom, back in the role of William Turner. Something about Bloom’s performance falls a bit short, making some scenes just not that believable for me. As for Keira Knightley’s character, Elizabeth Swann–I adored her in the first movie. Now, I dislike her immensely. Sure, she’s a girl trying to fit in with the boys — but I have two words for you to make her fit the stereotype: hissy fit. During one of the sword-fighting scenes, she stamps her feet, yelling at the men and throwing rocks. Real mature, eh? Something about that scene made me lose the respect I had for the girl who could engage in a fight with some of the dirtiest pirates and come out victorious.

Jack Davenport is back as Commodore Norrington, one of the many men who almost caught Captain Jack Sparrow. He has been stripped of both his title and dignity. Now, he’s thirsting for revenge and ready to do whatever it takes to gain back the things he lost. Davenport does a fantastic job making you loathe him. Stellan Skarsgard makes his debut as Bootstrap Bill Turner. His portrayal is touching, as you see him struggle to make sure his son survives. The best performance is going to the brilliant Bill Nighy, who plays the notorious Captain of the Flying Dutchman, the one and only Davy Jones. The slimy sea-creature is brilliantly evil and the acting will send chills creeping up your spine.

If you haven’t seen Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl, I’d dust off a copy and watch it. There are several references to it, as well as many characters who make cameos in the new movie.

You want a blockbuster? Well, set aside your cape and forget superheroes. Instead, grab your best eyepatch and set sail to the nearest theater. Think pirates. Pirates of the Caribbean, that is.

disney.go.com/disneypictures/pirates

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