Music Reviews
The Armed Forces

The Armed Forces

Proudly Present Modern Gospel for Modern Men & Women

Goldtooth

Here’s another power-pop / power-punk band that is technically competent, energetic, and hard to remember when removed from your CD player. The driving force behind The Armed Forces is Brandon Jazz, singer and guitarist. He picks up other musicians as needed for less-pressing tasks like drumming and back-up vocals. His voice is clean and pleasant, if unremarkable, and his song styling is clever, yet a derivative of the last 20 years of Punk / New Wave fusion. Lyrically he’s struck just enough of a pose to rewrite Patti Smith’s “Rock and Roll Nigger” and echo Turbonegro’s macho war talk by threatening the world with an atom bomb in “In The Free World.” This five-song EP isn’t objectionable, and Mr. Jazz has the talent to make something of his band, but he needs to find a niche that plays to his strengths.

The Armed Forces: http://www.myspace.com/thearmedforces


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