Music Reviews
Slow Club

Slow Club

Christmas, Thanks For Nothing EP

Moshi Moshi

UK-based Baroque/noisepop duo Slow Club have delved into that most festive of rock traditions – the Christmas song! In fact, they’ve decided to do us five better with a digital-exclusive EP of covers and standards that runs the holiday hymn gamut, from a Phil Spector-style raveup to a severe case of Low-esque Christmas blues. The centerpiece of the album is, goddamn yes, a joyous, intense run through of “Christmas (Baby Please Come Home).” Sure, it’s a pocket-sized version of the Wall of Sound, but they throw in background singers aplenty, a legion of broken guitars, and the requisite sleigh bells. There’s also an instrumental cover of “Silent Night,” played on blown-out distorted organ pedals – all delicious snowglobe melancholy. The rest of the album leans toward the melancholy and cynical, knocking down them Christmas trees. “All Alone on Christmas” is a potent slice of wintry loneliness, summing up all of the bad feelings and hurt that a BETOGETHERNOW holiday like Christmas can bring. “It’s Christmas and You’re Boring Me” has vicious lyrics that Morrissey could probably use: “You’ve made me happy/ But you don’t excite me/ I’ll wait till New Year’s to tell you that we’re through.” Just when you’re about to throw the whole fucking thing in like last year’s tinsel, there comes the spry, bouncy, open-hearted declaration of arch longing (delivered under a wrapping of organ and jumpy acoustic guitar) with the sweet promise that if these two separated lovers actually manage to get it together and get together, they’ll just hold each other and watch Christmas TV. Well that’s just nice. Are those sleighbells I hear on the roof?

Slow Club: http://www.audiojelly.com/?a=singles/328995


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