The Rolling Stones The Marquee Club Live in 1971

The Rolling Stones The Marquee Club Live in 1971

The Rolling Stones The Marquee Club Live in 1971

Eagle Vision

Oh, if only you could get all the Auto-tuned, ProTools “bands” of this generation together in a room and play them this DVD. Because the Rolling Stones in the early ’70s WERE the ultimate rock and roll force, and this gritty, funky session proves it.

Only a few months before the band fled the UK because of high taxes and found themselves in France, Sticky Fingers was due to be released and the band played the Marquee Club in London. It was probably the smallest venue the “golden era Stones” (referring to the years with Mick Taylor) played, and they absolutely demolish it. Opening with “Live With Me”, the Stones, along with Bobby Keys and Jim Price on horns and Nicky Hopkins and Ian Stewart on keyboards, hit a groove early and never give it up. Taylor is the ultimate lead guitarist, his fluid, melodic lines soaring over Keith Richards scrappy rhythm, always complementing each other, never clashing. Jagger proves his mantle as one of the best front-men ever, even on the tiny Marquee stage.

The setlist is heavy with tracks from the upcoming Sticky Fingers release- “Dead Flowers”, “Bitch”, “Brown Sugar” and the rarely performed “I’ve Got The Blues” which the Stones manage to bring a bit of Memphis soul to Marquee, lead by Bobby Keys wailing sax. “Let It Rock”, the great Chuck Berry classic (which was on the Spanish version of Sticky Fingers is dusted off from back in the bands early days, and a more relaxed version of “Satisfaction” is given space to breathe.

Yeah, this DVD captures one of rock’s ultimate moments, that of one of the greatest of all doing what they do best, in humble surroundings. Rock- and the Rolling Stones- were rarely better. Experience it again, and pass it along to the next generation. It’s your duty.

www.rollingstones.com

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