Music Reviews
The Moms

The Moms

Doing Asbestos We Can

Bar/None

Power-pop bands shall always live among us, hiding between the hard rockers and sappy folk singers. “The Moms” isn’t the best name I’ve ever heard, but the music is decent, and I can hear their roots drilling down through new wave and Brill Building love songs and the early still danceable Beatles sound. There’s a bit of Pixies, a dollop of Buddy Holly, and a wall of electric guitar that builds a podium for the lead singer. I’m not sure WHO the lead singer is, like so many up and coming bands their websites are a bit…murky. I can narrow it down to Joey Nester, or perhaps Jon or Matt Stolpe; but if it’s not important to them it’s not important to us.

The Mom’s come out strong with “Good Job”. Its melodic structure may have been hijacked from Weezer, but I couldn’t swear to it. “Fortunate Former” makes a swinging ‘60’s statement, its high energy statement that occasionally pulls us up short and makes us rethink the melody, but only long enough to grab some oxygen. Then, it’s back into its urgent beat blender. Slow tracks pop up, but they never excite like the speedier material. All these tracks clock in around 3:05, and they never hang around longer than they really need do. Heck, “Rock the Boat” hits and runs a punkish 1:30, it just boasts better vocals and you can make out what they sing, and jump in yourself on the second speed chorus. Moms, you’ve really done it this time!

https://www.bar-none.com/the-moms/


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