Orlando Fringe Festival 2018 – Day 4

Orlando Fringe Festival 2018 – Day 4

Orlando Fringe Festival 2018 – Day 4

Orlando, Florida

I hate to admit I’m not sure what went down here, but I don’t want to seem uncool. So…we are in the dark. James arrives, all in grey and a lampshade on his head. Jamesy follows, and as finger puppets they explore the space, sometimes in the dark, sometimes lit by their lampshades. By the end of the show, they are crawling up the audience’s seats, debating “what comes next?” and chatting amiably about their next step. And…the lights come up. Surrealism, but framed by a liberating palette of gray. Weirdly cool.

It’s almost like watching and old silent movie, but without the risk of nitrate film burning. An unnamed woman with magical eye rolling skills wakes up and begins her day, clowning with tableware and an over coat. Her guy walks through a hurricane wind, then gives us one the best ring juggling shows I’ve seen. Artfully staged and beautifully engaging, this is a must see “kids of all ages” production,

There’s bad timing, and then there’s moving to Berlin the day the Nazi’s declare war on Poland. Young Elanor’s German American father thinks powerful leaders are good, and he moves his family from rural New Jersey to the Fatherland. As the war progresses, the conditions deteriorate from harassment to rationing to phosphorus bombs falling every night to a full on Russian invasion. Horrific and fascinating, this is a first-person report from hell.

This gay-friendly county music concert mixes Elvis Presley, stories of growing up and coming out in Montgomery Alabama and finding disappointment in the theme park industry. The music is classic and stories timeless.

It takes a village to raise a child, but sometimes the only villager is mom. Megan takes a writing gig in NYC while hubby stays back to run the ranch. Their child in in the Terrible Twos, causing no end of embarrassment from crying on a cheap flight from Chicago to NYC, using poop as an artistic medium, and forcing mom to learn one handed typing. It’s a homey story, filled with humor and sympathy.

Jules Verne’s “Island of Doctor Moreau” remains one of his best stories. Our narrator washes up on shore to discover the doctor’s vivisection experiments in this remote atoll. The story becomes a shadow puppet show, mixed with live action, and offers a fresh take on this chestnut. The beer tent people outside were concerned about all the yelling, but don’t worry, most of the audience will emerge unharmed.

orlandofringe.org

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