Print Reviews
1967: How I Got There and Why I Never Left

1967: How I Got There and Why I Never Left

Robyn Hitchcock

Akashic

The premise behind this book is well contained in its title: a very directed reminiscence of a pivotal year in young Hitchcock’s life, spanning the calendar year but at no point overstepping the boundaries, addressing things that happened before and after with a sort of hazy, dismissive air.

Pris approves
Pris approves

Robyn Hitchcock is best known for his musical output, but his artistic and literary work exists within the same plane of psychedelic absurdity. All of it can seemingly be traced to this pivotal year, one in which young Hitchcock, entering puberty and spending his first year at an archetypical English boarding school, discovers Bob Dylan and psychedelic artwork, becomes acquainted with the guitar, and experiences a visitation from a blue-spectacled Brian Eno at a basement Happening.

The music that is referenced (starting with “Like a Rolling Stone”) makes for some familiar signposts, and although the songs and artists are not name-checked as often as you might think, the feeling is that the music and album artwork of this year had a singular effect on all of Hitchcock’s later work.

This book is a quick read, and Hitchcock is an able guide through his memories, adding the right amounts of humor and sentimentality to remind you that these are his personal recollections, and not fiction or hyperbole. There are no misty recollections or shocking revelations, but plenty of moments that will make you laugh or sigh in contentment.

Robyn HitchcockAkashic Books


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