• Josephine Foster and the Victor Herrero Band

    Josephine Foster and the Victor Herrero Band

    Perlas (Fire Records). Review by Matthew Moyer.

  • Chelsea Wolfe

    Chelsea Wolfe

    Apokalypsis (Pendu Sound). Review by Matthew Moyer.

  • Arrington De Dionyso

    Arrington De Dionyso

    Malaikat Dan Singa (K Records). Review by Matthew Moyer.

  • Arrington de Dionyso

    Arrington de Dionyso

    Despite a discography that would make you expect a persona along the lines of a reincarnated Captain Beefheart, in conversation, Arrington de Dionyso is polite and eager to communicate his artistic mission in as understated a manner as possible. Ink 19 caught up with the artist on a rare day off, somewhere in Texas, to speak about his new album Malaikat Dan Singa, performance, and making music to conjure spirits.

  • Video Hysterie: 1978-2006

    Video Hysterie: 1978-2006

    Matthew Moyer believes that this new Lydia Lunch DVD retrospective provides a fine primer for a life well-lived on the fringes of art and expression.

  • Diamanda Galas

    Diamanda Galas

    Guilty Guilty Guilty (Mute). Review by Matthew Moyer.

  • Lydia Lunch

    Lydia Lunch

    Shelton Hull refers to the feminist vision of the inimitable Lydia Lunch as “seminal” and lives to tell the tale.

  • Peter Murphy

    Peter Murphy

    When Gothic godfather (oh stop it) Peter Murphy swept into Jacksonville on the 4th of July with a bag full of hits and Bauhaus classics, Matthew Moyer dropped his bottle rockets and went to check out the REAL fiireworks.

  • Khlyst

    Khlyst

    Chaos Is My Name (Hydra Head). Review by Matthew Moyer.

  • Arrington De Dionyso

    Arrington De Dionyso

    Breath Of Fire (K Records). Review by Matthew Moyer.

  • Rykarda Parasol

    Rykarda Parasol

    Here She Comes (Blood of the Young Records). Review by Kyrby Raine.

  • Vincent & Mr. Green

    Vincent & Mr. Green

    Vincent & Mr. Green (Ipecac). Review by Kiran Aditham.

  • John Paul Jones

    Even if only his status as one-quarter of Led Zepplin is taken into account, few could deny that John Paul Jones deserves to be revered. But more than 20 years after the end of Zep, Jones remains a vital and diverse artist. Gail Worley talks to a true musical legend.

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