• Four-Letter Words

    Four-Letter Words

    No need to worry about offending delicate sensibilities with this playlist. We’re not talking about profanity, so just take the title at face value.

  • Derailroaded: Inside the Mind of Larry “Wild Man” Fischer

    Derailroaded: Inside the Mind of Larry “Wild Man” Fischer

    Larry “Wild Man” Fischer went from paranoid street performer to the “Godfather of Outsider Music.” Derailroaded captures the fine line between madness and art, but James Mann wonders — at what cost?

  • Allan Sherman

    Allan Sherman

    My Son the Folk Singer | My Son the Celebrity | My Son the Nut | For Swinging Livers Only! (Collector’s Choice Music). Review by Carl F Gauze.

  • “Weird Al” Yankovic

    “Weird Al” Yankovic

    The Essential “Weird Al” Yankovic (Legacy Recordings). Review by Tim Wardyn.

  • Bill Plympton’s Dog Days

    Bill Plympton’s Dog Days

    Bill Plympton offers a refreshing taste of intelligent animation to those who would be infinitely entertained by drooly dog antics.

  • Les Claypool

    Les Claypool

    Fancy (Prawn Song Records). Review by Cindy Barrymore.

  • Neil Hamburger

    Neil Hamburger

    S D Green peels back the tuxedo and gets an earful — about celebrities living in cardboard boxes, Carrot Top pooing into a trunk, and even a little bit about Hamburger‘s new album, Neil Hamburger Sings Country Winners.

  • Whitee

    Sapphic Delight (Smegma). Review by Bill Campbell.

  • Atom and His Package

    Christopher R. Weingarten gets a few words with the punk rocker most hated by his own community, the "Atom" half of Atom and His Package, Adam Goren. The Package, alas, remains unavailable for comment.

  • Hayseed Dixie

    A Hillbilly Tribute to AC/DC (Dualtone/Western Beat). Review by Julio Diaz.

  • Dweezil Zappa

    When you’re the guitar prodigy son of a music legend, the pressure’s on before the first note is played. How does Dweezil Zappa handle the expectations of life in the shadow of musical genius Frank? By just having fun with it! Gail Worley shoots the breeze with the strangely named scion of the Zappa family.

  • They Might Be Giants

    You can’t accuse They Might Be Giants of being slackers. After more than 15 years together, the already-prolific band is releasing a boatload of music, including work on Malcolm in the Middle and their first children’s album. Julio Diaz cornered John Flansburgh during a rare moment off, and got the latest on this extremely talented — and busy! — band.

  • Weird Al Yankovic

    "Weird Al" Yankovic at the Bayfront Auditorium in Pensacola, FL, on October 5, 2000. Concert review and photos by Phil Bailey.

Recently on Ink 19...

  • Four-Letter Words
    Four-Letter Words

    No need to worry about offending delicate sensibilities with this playlist. We’re not talking about profanity, so just take the title at face value.

  • A Genesis In My Bed
    A Genesis In My Bed

    Former Genesis guitarist, Steve Hackett shares his life story in his story in an engaging and honest memoir. Reading his story feels like hanging out with a friend who’s interested in sharing how he felt living these experiences.

  • The Jayhawks
    The Jayhawks

    XOXO (Sham/Thirty Tigers). Review by Jeremy Glazier.

  • 18 to Party
    18 to Party

    When you’re in 8th grade, sneaking into a bar is way cooler than it is when you’re 40.

  • Adam
    Adam

    A pregnant woman finds a home in Casablanca.

  • 2020 on Fire
    2020 on Fire

    Sound Salvation takes on current events with a playlist addressing the current fight for racial and social justice in America and the battles playing out in the streets in the aftermath of the death of George Floyd.

  • Pokey Lafarge
    Pokey Lafarge

    Rock Bottom Rhapsody (New West Records). Review by Jeremy Glazier.

  • Landfall
    Landfall

    Cecilia Aldarondo takes a look at Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria.

  • Daniel Silva
    Daniel Silva

    Drummer Daniel Silva talks influences and more with Stacey Zering.

  • Bill Kirchen
    Bill Kirchen

    The Proper Years (Last Music Co.). Review by James Mann.