Print Reviews

Wisdom’s Maw

Todd Brendan Fahey

Far Gone

This novel takes the premise that the drug counter-culture of the ’60s was engineered by the CIA in an effort to undermine the political left, and spins it into a very entertaining read. By weaving together a “fictional” conspiracy around the Merry Pranksters, Project MK-Ultra, the Hell’s Angels, Aldous Huxley, the CIA, and yet another twist on the JFK assassination, Fahey creates what could possibly be the first of a new genre – a spy novel informed by the characters and events in popular/underground culture. It seems that Fahey uses real names where the character is dead and pseudonyms when they are not. Those familiar with the history will have fun figuring out who is who. He chooses Franklin Moore (a.k.a. Ken Kesey) as the central character, and we get to vicariously enjoy some of his “fictional” exploits as the story unfolds. A great deal of the fun with Wisdom’s Maw is trying to separate the fact from the fiction, but as the story takes hold the distinction becomes less and less important. Possibly a bit like some of the chemically induced experiences Fahey’s characters helped introduce to the masses. Far Gone Books, P.O. Box 43745, Lafayette, LA 70504-3745; http://www2.linknet.net/fahey/Wisdom


Recently on Ink 19...

Matías Meyer

Matías Meyer

Interviews

With only a week to go before powerful new feature Louis Riel or Heaven Touches The Earth premieres in the Main Slate at UNAM International Film Festival, Lily and Generoso sat down for an in-depth conversation with the film’s director, Matías Meyer.

Mostly True

Mostly True

Print Reviews

Carl F. Gauze reviews the fascinating Mostly True: The West’s Most Popular Hobo Graffiti Magazine, a chronicle of forgotten outsider subculture.

The Tin Star

The Tin Star

Screen Reviews

Anthony Mann’s gorgeous monochrome western, The Tin Star, may have been shot in black and white, but its themes are never that easily defined.

Flipside

Flipside

Screen Reviews

Charles DJ Deppner finds Flipside to be a vital treatise on mortality, creativity, and purpose, disguised as a quirky documentary about a struggling record store.

Stereophonic

Stereophonic

Music News

Tony-nominated smash success Stereophonic delivers a brand-new Broadway cast recording — straight from 1976.

Cocoa the Tour Dog

Cocoa the Tour Dog

Print Reviews

Cocoa the Tour Dog is the heartwarming true story of a boy and his dog and his reggae band. Bob Pomeroy reviews the book by Adam Mansbach and reggae artist Stick Figure, with illustrations by Juan Manuel Orozco.

TRF Boog

TRF Boog

Features

First Single “Dump It” from TRF Boog’s forthcoming ME vs ME LP premieres today, at Ink 19.

Melt-Banana

Melt-Banana

Event Reviews

Veteran Tokyo punk band Melt-Banana brings Tomato Flower and Baby; Baby: Explores the Reasons Why that Gum is Still on the Sidewalk to Denver, Colorado, for an all-out punk feast. Meow.