Categories
Gear Reviews

THR10

THR10

Desktop Amplifier

Yamaha

To the experienced electric guitarist or bassist, the thought of a ten watt amp will make them think of the cheap boxes that every beginner axeman is saddled with, small speakers a-crackle with distortion from trying to play louder than the stereo. These amps are quickly outgrown, as they may be able to successfully be heard alongside another ten-watter, but not over a drum kit, or a neighbor that talks particularly loud.

The THR series, which to date includes a five and ten watt model, has been an interesting gamble by Yamaha, a company that has made a name for itself in venue amplification and speakers but has yet to dabble in the complex and treacherous field of instrument amplification, in which tonal character and distortion are not your enemy but your friend. Lacking any sort of recognition in the field, it makes sense for Yamaha to carve a new niche for itself with a new kind of amplifier. But before we consider its implications, let’s look at the specs.

That warm glow is all-digital

That warm glow is all-digital

The THR10 is about the size of a loaf of bread, with rounded edges, a tan metal casing and chromed bar handle, and gimmicky-but-lovable fake tube lighting coming from within when you turn it on. The amp is powered by either a wall wart or eight AA batteries. For inputs, it gives you a single instrument jack, and a stereo headphone jack to connect your sound-making gadget of choice.

For the instrument signal, things start with a convenient built-in tuner. Not very accurate, but it’ll get you there. You can select an amp model (conveniently labeled “Clean”, “Crunch”, “Modern”, and so on, or you can select “Flat”), adjust the Gain and Volume, tweak a three-channel EQ with bass, middles and highs, and shape your sound with two multipurpose effects knobs, which let you put in the desired amount of a single modulation effect (chorus, flanger, phaser, tremolo) and a single delay effect (delay, delay/reverb, spring or hall reverb). The tuner activation button serves double duty as tap-tempo for the delay effects.

Output is handled by a couple of 8 centimeter (about 3.25 inches) speakers located safely inside the metal enclosure, and there’s a stereo headphone 1/4″ jack and a USB out. There are individual volume controls for the instrument and the aux input, a nice touch, and five preset buttons to which you can assign your favorite combinations.

A view of the controls

A view of the controls

The USB output serves two purposes. The first is to provide a digital input signal which you can easily connect to your computer. Once the drivers are installed, the amp is available as an input source in your favorite DAW, on Mac or Windows. I can’t speak for Windows, but it worked transparently on the Mac Mini I tested on.

The second purpose is far more interesting. Once you have downloaded and installed the “THR Editor” software from Yamaha’s website, you can connect your THR10 to your computer and access additional features on the amp. Besides providing a library for saving and restoring your favorite tones past the five presets available on the amp itself, it allows you to access the specifics for the built-in effects. For example, using the physical effect knob you can choose a little chorus, a bit more, or a lot, but using the editor software you can set a specific speed, depth, and mix.

Going beyond the ability to edit these parameters, the software offers access to options not available on the amp itself. You can select from one of six cabinet emulators, use a compressor and noise gate, and choose from additional room or plate-style reverbs. It’s easy to tweak parameters to your exact liking, then save them to a library on your computer or one of the amp’s presets.

What does all of this add up to? Initially, it’s a bit of a mystery. The THR10 is not a practice amp you can take to band practice — by itself it sounds impressively loud, but it’s not enough to cut through the other instruments. Although it sports a wide variety of great-sounding amp models, tone controls, and built-in effects, neither is it intended for use as a stop on your signal line, since it doesn’t feature a line out (unless you want to hook something up via the headphone jack and some shackage). It’s not exactly cheap, either. For about the average $300 retail price, you can get an amp with more modeling options and 75 watts, and you can pick up a 15 watt amp with roughly the same features for a third of the price.

Remember that “new type of amplifier” teaser earlier? I’m going to call this a “desktop amp” since that has been its duty with your humble reviewer for the last few weeks. No, ten watts is not that loud, but it’s loud enough to play at your desk. The low watts mean you can run the amp off batteries and keep it handy, without having to fumble for a power outlet. You can take it with you on the porch, to the park, or if you’re particularly bold, to the beach. Yamaha claims 6-7 hours of battery life on a fresh set of alkalines, and my experience has been varied. I’ve been able to run the amp about that long on low-medium settings, less on louder ones. Rechargeable batteries are good for a couple of hours.

The THR10 in its natural environment

The THR10 in its natural environment

However, it’s the attention to design that cinches it over these nods to practicality. The THR10 simply looks good sitting on my desk. It takes up minimal space, and when I need to, it’s easy to move around. I can quickly connect my phone’s output to its speaker as an additional source to practice with, or just to play something from the phone over a better set of speakers. It’s friendly, comfortable, and not so feature-laden as to prompt you to obsess over settings when you should be playing your instrument. When coming up with a new product category, it’s important to have a well thought out flagship product, not only to insure your success but to provide a high standard for the eventual competition. Whatever comes along that can best the THR10 is going to be a good thing.

This is not to say the model is perfect. I could not get a decent sound out of the “Bass” modeling amp with my bass, through the speakers or headphones. Other amp models fared better with the bass, but none were good enough for me to consider it for practicing the instrument. This could be because of my bass’s active electronics, or any number of other factors; I only have the one bass to test with, and this shortcoming stands out because I was able to get many great sounds out of each of the variety of other instruments I plugged in (various acoustic and electric guitars and ukuleles). The amp will also shut off if you overload it by playing too loud, and this happens more often if you’re running on batteries. I imagine this is due to the limited voltage supplied by the batteries or transformer, and the amp comes right on once you switch it off and on again, but it can be an annoying thing to happen at the peak of your improvisation.

If you are looking for a small and portable amplifier that looks good and frees you up to practice your electric instrument as easily as you would an acoustic, the THR10 is your best bet. You’ll be able to pick up your instrument and go anywhere, or simply fit it in some scales while you’re waiting for a download to finish, without a lot of gear and/or setup. It’s a bit pricey for a small amp, but it is a great value, and more importantly, something that can make the way you practice your instrument more enjoyable.

Yamaha: usa.yamaha.com

Categories
Gear Reviews

Intermediate Guitar Method

Intermediate Guitar Method

CD-ROM

eMedia

I have always been a miserable guitar player, although I did use to be in a few bands. Well, maybe just one real band, and that one sucked thoroughly. We were two guitarists in there, and I never got to play any solos, which was just shitty. I mean, the other guy was way better than me, but he played so safe and dull and shit. I was pretty good at being noisy, so I should be doing all the soloing. That’s probably the main reason why I quit the band.

The bass player from that band and me started practicing with different people, playing all kinds of stupid music. It was super fun, but we never got around to do anything with it. Later on, I figured I was going to be a real deep singer-songwriter kind of guy. I even bought one of those four-track recorders and wrote and recorded loads of shitty songs. I still got them, but I never listen to them, mainly because the lame ass four-track recorder broke, and you can’t play these cassettes on a regular deck, because they’re so sped-up.

Anyway, the point is, I’ve always been a shitty guitar player, and I’ve never really practiced it either. I learned all the basics — the chords, “Tom Dooley” type of songs, some finger picking — and that took me ages, because I never really sat down to practice it. Pretty stupid, obviously, and probably a main reason why I haven’t touched a guitar for the last few years. You get bored playing the same things over and over again, having fallen into a rut and not knowing how to get out of it. And if it’s not fun, why bother with it?

So, anyway, when the offer to review this new course from eMedia came up, I jumped at the chance to start from scratch again. I decided that Intermediate Guitar Method was going to be the CD-ROM that would bring out the great guitar player that must surely nestle inside me somewhere.

This is the second part of eMedia’s guitar courses and it’s assumed you know the very basics of guitar playing — that is, how to hold it, how to strum, how to finger open chords, and stuff like that. Nothing too complicated. There’s an electronic guitar tuner feature included, a metronome, a recorder, a massive chord diagram, and tons of scales, and so, if you’ve been playing just a wee bit guitar already, you might as well skip the first lesson and jump directly to this one.

The course is divided into six chapters, and it’s recommended that you go through them chronologically. I decide I’m not going to blow my chances at greatness this early on, so I do as I’m told. We’re kicking off with some left-hand technique stuff, far less exciting than it may sound for the uninitiated. We roll through hammer-ons, pull-offs, trills, vibratos, slides, and bending strings. We play the melody lines to “Oh Susanna,” “Amazing Grace,” “Scarborough Fair,” and “House of the Rising Sun.” All your guitar textbook standards, then. Verdi’s “Largo” pops up along the way, but that’s the odd one out. Easy peasy. Out of the blue comes this 12-bar blues solo thing and I’ll have to focus a bit, but all in all, a pretty basic chapter and a sweet start.

It’s pretty neat stuff: there are some nice multi-colored dots to keep you company while you’re playing, there are loads of sound bites, commentaries, straightforward explanations to what you’re doing at any given time, and video clips of this guitar instructor, Kevin Garry, playing along with you. One complaint, though: Playing melody lines without a backing track is dumb. You strike a note, it dies out, complete silence, and you strike another note. Why aren’t there some cheap MIDI tracks on here?

Chapter two: Right-hand techniques. Alright, loads of barre chords in here. Those are tricky bastards, so if you haven’t been there before, this could keep you occupied for some time. Thankfully, I figured them out many a moon ago. If I can do it, anyone can. Bear that in mind, kiddies.

The sound clip to “Midnight Special” has this guy singing along. Hurrah, I was beginning to feel lonely in here. This is great, and yeah, the singer stays with us through the remaining course. We’re jammin’, baby! Or at least we’re going through some more standards — “All Along the Watchtower,” “I’m Your Captain,” and “Touch Of Grey.” Fair enough. Ok, left hand, check. Right hand, check. Let’s join forces. On to chapter three!

Strumming styles. We’re really rocking now. Stuff like palm muting and blues shuffle. We play Johnny Cash’s “Drive On” and we do a pretty fun version of Willie Dixon’s “Spoonful.” Practicing strumming, though, is a bit of a drag. This chapter’s fun because it’s got some cool songs in it, but practicing the different techniques is very un-fun. Next!

Whoops, am I moving to fast? Because suddenly we’re in theory hell. This one’s called “Using Scales and Building Chords,” and it’s every bit as theoretical as it sounds. Mastering Bach’s “Gavotte” should give you some immediate satisfaction and a sense of fulfillment. But stay with it, it gets even more complicated. You’ll learn stuff like, what’s an augmented 7th chord and what exactly are those four-tone chords. Very un-punk and there’s loads of text in here. This is one of those chapters that you’ll rush through for now and return to when you’ve finished everything else in here. Especially considering what the following chapter has in store for us.

Guitar solos! Whoo hoo! Disappointingly, this is the least interesting of the chapters — we mainly get a random selection of solos, progressing from the very basics to the Hendrix stuff, but with no real motivation for it other than to learn a few licks here and there. And once again, why are there no backing tracks included? Guitar solos are lame without backing tracks.

So, last chapter then: Fingerstyle guitar. In which you learn to play Heart’s “Dreamboat Annie,” “The Water is Wide,” and a version of Jim Croce’s “Time in a Bottle” that should bring your girl-/boyfriend to her/his knees in no time. Fine closing piece here, with everything explained in enough detail to let you know what you’re doing at any one time. I still have some practicing to do before I wrap up this last chapter but hey, that’s what it’s all about, isn’t it?

Really, this is quite the comprehensive package from eMedia, one of the most exemplary and impressive guitar courses I’ve encountered. There are few misses in here and a clear and well-directed build-up. Easy to operate, with a nice presentation that doesn’t distract from the real purpose of the CD: to teach guitar playing. And you can’t really go wrong with this one.

eMedia Music Corp.: http://www.emediamusic.com

Categories
Gear Reviews

Multiple Arcade Machine Emulator

Multiple Arcade Machine Emulator

OK, I’m sure half of you out there will say “Oh, I’ve known about that for years.” Fine, go play with your Zork. But the other half of you who spent most of the ’80s and all of your allowance in the arcade need to visit this site. You can now have ALL of those high school memories on your own desktop. Yes, some one has written a free Pac-Man emulator. And Zaxxon and Asteroids and Missile Command and literally thousands of other classic arcade games will now run on a free piece of code called MAME. That’s Multiple Arcade Machine Emulator, a highly successful piece of open source code begun by Nicola Salmoria back in 1996.

With time on his hands and a busted video console, Mr. S spent the time and effort to read the ROM firmware and emulate a 3 MHz 8080 microprocessor on a 300 MHz Pentium. Since many classic games ran on this or other early, well-documented microprocessors, the floodgates were open. Anyone with access to an old arcade video machine and some Electronics 101 skills can suck out the heart of these old machines, and buff it up to the point your 32 bit 16 gazillion color monitor can relive games originally written for 8 bit VGA displays. And it’s all free and largely legal.

Almost. While the code is free, and many games are available for free download, there is one important legal requirement you need to know. You may only posses ROM file with copyrighted code if you actually own the original circuit cards, or a game cartridge that plays the same version. All the copyrighted characters, games, and so forth still belong to the original owner, and will well past your life time. Ink 19 urges you to obey all copy write laws. Read the legal stuff on the MAME Web site, and respect it.

But, if you DO still have an old Tron game lying about, MAME provides an easy way to relive it on your laptop. Download a 3-meg zip file, expand it out, and put the ROM files where they tell you. The only hard part is now you must open a DOS prompt, and type in a command line. For the point and click since birth crowd, it’s all explained in a very thorough FAQ. Hit a few key, and voila! The game appears! Joysticks and mice are supported, along with multiplayer gaming and a few games even support networked multiplayer gaming. All you have to do is figure out how the game was played originally, and if that brain cell died there are other sites out there to help. This code will even remember your high score, and award bonus games.

This is really a fascinating site; whether you just want to show your children how hard things were when you were in high school, (“The snow was up to HERE when I had to walk to the mall!”) or if you’re a serious computer historian who want to help preserve a fading part of our digital heritage, MAME grabs the high ground of Fun Mountain. The MAME source code is freely available, has been ported to more operating systems than most people know about, and the MAME project is looking for skilled coders. And, unlike those of you who may be trying to crack FlexLM 7, no jail time is hanging over your head. Got another virtual quarter?

http://www.mame.net/

Categories
Gear Reviews

Black Adam

Black Adam Action Figure

DC Direct

“Bring on the bad guys,” cried the unwashed masses, and after the recent humdrum Green Lantern wave, DC Direct responded in a most unexpected fashion — Black Adam! Captain Marvel’s ancient foe! A month or so early! Shazam! Him too! Black Adam is, of course, the immortal enemy of the Shazam force; one of a long line of evil men who use the power locked within an ancient Egyptian scarab (conveniently included with the figure — use if you dare!). He’s supposedly gone straight and joined the JSA but I’ll believe that when I see it. But back to the plastic matter at hand. I’ve been drooling over the prospect of this little bugger for some time now, so let me enjoy this, as I stick him under the critical microscope.

Word has it on the DC Direct message boards that this Black Adam’s body is actually a repaint of the original Captain Marvel deluxe figure, issued a year or so back. There was then some grousing on said message boards about that as well. To that I reply — bollocks! Number one, who cares about the original Captain Marvel figure? Ancient history — it’s a solid, accurate body sculpt, so there. Remember He-Man? Fucking hell, every single figure got the steroid maximus body sculpt, accuracy be damned! This body has the proper outfit and proper proportions, which brings me to… Number two, remember that Black Adam is the evil counterpart/twin to Captain Marvel, like a negative image, so it stands to reason that they’d have equal physiques, stacked up, pound for pound. Gold boots, wristlets, and sash? Check. Black tights? Check. Lurid gold lightning bolt mocking everything Captain Marvel stands for? Check.

On the head sculpt — my god, it’s impressive. The detail on the DC Direct villains’ facial features has been at times breathtaking (especially in the case of Star Sapphire and Captain Cold) and Black Adam is no slouch either. The face is all razor sharp angles and translucent skin, looking like it was carved out of pure cocaine. Hair is jet black, scraped back from the forehead, exposing a severe vampire hairline. Piercing black eyes, aristocratic frown — damn good stuff. Black Adam seems to this big softie to be as much David Bowie in The Man Who Fell to Earth as he is super villain extraordinaire. Hmmm. Regardless of occult rock connections, Black Adam is perfect to channel the glory days of Whiz Comics and the Monster Society of Evil. Would C.C. Beck play with this toy? Of course he would.

DC Direct: http://www.dccomics.com/dcdirect/

Categories
Gear Reviews

eMedia Guitar Method 1

eMedia Guitar Method 1

PC/Mac CD-ROM

eMedia Music

There has generally been two ways to learn guitar: Take expensive lessons from somebody who wants you to learn major and minor scales, and strum “Tom Dooley,” or do it yourself, replaying that Grateful Dead song over and over until you’re jamming, which is all you really wanted to do in the first place. Now there have been books, tapes, videos, etc. to help the learn at home Van Halen all along, but since they are basically all talk and no answer, if you got stuck, you really got stuck.

Enter the computer age, and CD-ROM. This entry-level guitar learning system should be a required purchase when a parent buys a kid a guitar for Christmas. Starting off with the basics of how a guitar works, tuning, and beginning chords, this CD explains things in an easy to understand manner. Short videos, sound clips, text, and MIDI sound bites all focus on getting the beginning player actually playing songs. And not “Tom Dooley,” either. By the end of this CD, you can play along with Dylan, The Stones, and numerous blues and pop favorites. Whenever a song plays, a guitar fretboard appears at the top of the screen, showing the chords as the song moves along. Included in the set is a tuning application as well as a digital metronome that appear on your screen. A simple recorder that allows the student to record their progress or play along with the music is added as well.

This is a well designed set, endlessly repeatable for the price of a few lessons with a guitar pro. It starts the beginner off playing songs, which is generally the best way to keep the spark of learning growing. You certainly have time later to learn your scales — and “Tom Dooley,” should you so desire. For Mac or PC.

eMedia: http://www.emediamusic.com

Categories
Gear Reviews

Cool Toys

Cool Toys

Little Enid Doll

Press-Pop Toys, Inc.

The Simpsons‘ World of Springfield Comic Book Store with Comic Book Guy

Playmates Toys

Bruce Lee Kubricks

Medicom Toy

What could be cooler or cuter than a Japanese style super-deformed action figure (or action doll, as the box art proclaims) of Enid Coleslaw, the heroine of Daniel Clowes’ Ghost World. The box art alone is worth the price, but the figure is just super cool. OK, the figure really doesn’t look like Clowes’ drawings, or like Thora Birch, but captures Enid’s wry personality perfectly. The box art proclaims it’s Enid as a little girl, fair enough. If you’re really into Ghost World or really into weird funky toys, be sure to track one of these down at your local comic store or online.

Speaking of comic book stores, the Playmates Toys Simpsons line has produced The Android’s Dungeon Comic Book Store in plastic, along with its bitter, rotund unnamed owner. Like all of these Simpsons toys, the figure and the environment are dead on likenesses, and to make the pot even sweeter, the figures talk. The Comic Book Guy utters such zingers as “Oh a sarcasm detector, that’s a really useful invention,” but the best is Homer’s timeless exclamation, “Are you sure this is a sci-fi convention? It’s full of nerds!”

OK. Pop quiz. Who’s cooler than Bruce Lee? No one! I mean, he made four moves and is still one of the biggest stars in the world. Who else has been cloned after their death? Did Hollywood have James Deen and James Dien start making movies after James Dean died? No. Would Geffen Records have put out records by Curt Kobain? Don’t think so. But Bruce Le, Bruce Li, and several other Bruce Lee clones took over worldwide movie screens for a decade after the Dragon’s death. Recently, in the wake of the adult toy explosion, several companies have begun making Bruce Lee toys. In fact, Bruce Lee is one of the hotter toy licenses. The coolest of these new toys is in the form of the Bruce Lee Kubricks. They have nothing to do with the late film director, but rather think “cube brick.” This is a Japanese toy line that is sort of a cross between Legos and Playmobil. They have several figure sets based on anime, Planet of the Apes, The Blair Witch Project, and now, Bruce Lee. The set features the Dragon in three outfits with great facial expressions and little weapons. Cool, man, cool.

http://www.thesimpsons.com, http://www.playmatestoys.com, http://www.medicomtoy.co.jp

Categories
Gear Reviews

Swiffer

Swiffer

Dust Remover

Procter & Gamble

It may seem odd to review a cleaning product in a music magazine, but if you’re reading this, then you probably fight the battles with dust. Electronic devices attract dust like mad. Who hasn’t marveled at the level of dust on their computer, stereo components, TV, or bass amp? If you have, you also know there isn’t a good way to get rid of it. Canned air only does so much and blows a lot of dust inside of your equipment and you certainly don’t want to use spray cleaners like Pledge. What to do?

Go to the store and buy Swiffer. It’s a new cleaning cloth that looks kind of like cheesecloth, but much softer. It picks up dirt, dust, hair, hell it’ll pick up a Cheerio. There are no sprays, no chemicals, they are totally safe for use on all kinds of electronics. The design of the cloth allows in to pick the offending crud rather that merely moving it around. You can also buy a mop kind of thing that allows you to use Swiffer on your hardwood floors. I’m not usually too impressed with cleaning products, but Swiffer is the real deal.

http://www.swiffer.com

Categories
Gear Reviews

Intellicast Weather

Intellicast Weather

Web Site

www.intellicast.com

Well, it worked, and by golly, they fixed it. Oh boy, did they ever.

All of my bookmarked pages return invalid (why, exactly, do these goofs simply THROW AWAY perfectly good web addresses instead of just changing the content of said same addresses?), and the replacement pages may, or may not, take up the slack. Most of the time they don’t.

And now there’s even MORE advertising crap bordering your weather info. Great, huh? Oh yeah, did I mention that the shit takes TWICE as long to load as it used to?

I can see all of them now, sitting there in an air conditioned room, having never EVER in their lives actually having set foot outside. Out there where there’s people who smell funny. Out there where fer chrissakes it just might RAIN on you.

“Well… whatta you say Louie?”

“We’re not making enough money.”

“OK, let’s just shrink the page a little, cram more adverts into the margins, tell the rubes in the sticks that it’s all a major improvement in the service, and be done with it.”

“Great idea, Vinnie. You da man.”

So I send them some e-mail, indicating that one of their even-slower-to-load-than-before web pages is returning MONTHS old data like some kind of Twilight Zone script. They reply with a canned piece of shit, advising me that they’re “hard at work at it” and supplying me with a whole slew of their sub-web pages, all of which I already saved and none of which address my problem. The fucks. I shall take my business elsewhere, I shall. The web’s a big place and there are plenty of other sources of information, especially the damned local weather. Fuck you, Intellicast!

Categories
Gear Reviews

Incompatible

Incompatible

Issues 1-2

Punk Uprisings/Victory

This is such a great idea, and one that is being done well. I love this so much. While it’s not really a new idea , it’s one that seems particularly well-suited to the CD compilation. It gives you so much more to explore about each band. Incompatible is a CD compilation/CD-ROM zine based in punk rock/hardcore. In addition to seventeen audio tracks, each enhanced CD features columns, interviews, band photos, videos, photo and art galleries, a student film, and a feature story. The videos and interviews are my favorite parts of this, as they give paint a fuller picture of what the band is all about. The videos are mostly video camera recordings of live shows with shaky video and distorted sound, but that kind of goes along with the bands. It’s not too hard to hear and see through that.

Issue #1 has been out for a while now, but I haven’t had a chance to view the multimedia content until recently. Favorites on this were the audio and video tracks (different songs) from Atom & His Package, I HATE YOU, and Kid Dynamite, as well as the audio tracks from Six Going On Seven and Less Than Jake. Arun Farm’s student film of “How a Bill Becomes a Law” is totally rad as well. Issue #2 favorites are video and audio tracks (again, different songs) from Ann Beretta (with a nice video), I Farm, and Daybreak, as well as audio tracks from Gameface, Anti Flag, Good Clean Fun, and the Stereo. The second volume seems to run better than the first, but also has items missing from what the CD booklet says should be included (some of the videos and columns, the animal ingredients piece, the reviews). I assume these were cut for space, but it was disappointing to not find them there.

Despite the missing items, I would say that both of these are damn near essential to anyone interested in these bands or styles that has a computer. Great job.

Punk Uprisings, P.O. Box 6771, Huntington Beach, CA 92615 www.punkuprisings.com; Victory Records, P.O. Box 146546, Chicago, IL 60614 www.victoryrecords.com

Categories
Gear Reviews

Country.Com’s Century Of Country

Country.Com’s Century Of Country

CD-ROM

Dreamworks Records

Finally! Swag from Ian I can use! This nifty disc is chock full of handy information on most of the performers that gave rise to the great American art form of country music. Hundreds of performers are profiled; thousands of label, performer, and industry addresses are given, which is a godsend. It seems to be rather complete, and balanced — Gram Parsons gets as much digital ink as Dolly Parton, which is close to how it should be. If you have a yen for learning more about this wonderful music, or if you work in the industry, then you should pick this encyclopedia up. Granted, I could have done without the tacked on music clips from the likes of Linda Davis and The Prince of Egypt – Nashville , but that’s mainly because I’m a grump. Great for settling bar fights in honky-tonks.