Music Reviews

Alto Monte

Ay Ay Ay 4!

Mecha

Last time I heard Alto Monte, it was on Viva Los Vegans!, an import-only compilation of the burgeoning Mexican mariachi-core scene. I’d never heard anything like Alto Monte’s intense combination of traditional mariachi band values with make-do Mexican punk rock ingenuity. Miking their acoustic instruments with condenser microphones ripped out of liberated boomboxes, and dressing in carefully tattered matching suits, Alto Monte’s single track, “La Puta Migra,” (a updated cover of the classic Los Patos tune) was an anthem to world justice and straightedge values.

Apparently, a lot has happened since then – the track was recorded three years before the compilation came out, and the band now calls Orlando home. Ay Ay Ay 4! keeps with the politically active nature of the band, but discards all pretense at traditional hardcore. In a massive barrage of sound, the band blares out pulsating wave of raw noise that obliterates all meaning to lyrics, to the point that I can’t even tell if they’re singing in English or Spanish. An interesting twist, especially given Alto Monte’s propensity to clear room in the sound spectrum for the occasional trumpet solo or bajo sexto run. Worth hearing, and I’d imagine the band is quite worth checking out live. Mecha Records, 1223 Calle Pollo, Mixtetlan, Mexico


Recently on Ink 19...

Joe Jackson

Joe Jackson

Event Reviews

Joe Jackson brought his Two Rounds of Racket tour to the Lincoln Theatre in Washington D.C. on Monday. Bob Pomeroy was in the area and caught the show.

Matías Meyer

Matías Meyer

Interviews

With only a week to go before powerful new feature Louis Riel or Heaven Touches The Earth premieres in the Main Slate at UNAM International Film Festival, Lily and Generoso sat down for an in-depth conversation with the film’s director, Matías Meyer.

Mostly True

Mostly True

Print Reviews

Carl F. Gauze reviews the fascinating Mostly True: The West’s Most Popular Hobo Graffiti Magazine, a chronicle of forgotten outsider subculture.

The Tin Star

The Tin Star

Screen Reviews

Anthony Mann’s gorgeous monochrome western, The Tin Star, may have been shot in black and white, but its themes are never that easily defined.

Flipside

Flipside

Screen Reviews

Charles DJ Deppner finds Flipside to be a vital treatise on mortality, creativity, and purpose, disguised as a quirky documentary about a struggling record store.