Music Reviews

Crime Jazz

Music in the First Degree

Music in the Second Degree

Rhino

Oh, dear readers! This is what happens when ole Lips loans records before he has reviewed them. Casual lounge guys don’t realize the cutthroat pace of the reissue racket – you scenesters already recognize this as old news, so feel free to wad up this review and spit shine those shoes.

You other cats, listen in, because this is one hot collection of the best that the worst had to offer – or at least it has that sound that says “Something bad and exciting is going on here!” If you’re sharp, you’ll purchase volume one for the sole purpose of making “Frankie Machine” from The Man with the Golden Arm your entrance theme. Guys or gals can make it work.

Other juicy familiar tidbits include the theme from Peter Gunn, the theme from Touch of Evil (we miss you, Mancini), the theme from Perry Mason and many others, tunes you’d recognize if you heard them but not if I spilled the names.

The real crime is not owning this. Put a little bombast and darkness in your collection.


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