Music Reviews

Hoover

Hoover

Slowdime

This CD is an all-too-brief return of the masters. Hoover have disbanded, and members have gone on to form such bands as June of ‘44, the Crownhate Ruin, and Regulator Watts. This release is both a document/post- mortem for a great band and a valuable history lesson as well. Hoover first shook the world about 3 or 4 years ago on a split 7” with a band called Lincoln on Art Monk Construction records. Many still regard this as one of the best splits ever put out, and it is certainly worth seeking out. In 1993, Hoover released an LP on Dischord entitled The Lurid Transversal of Route 7. This band did things on that LP that were never deemed possible. They made water run uphill. The precision was so calculated, it utterly put the lie to the theory that a band must be sloppy to be emotional. And emotional it most definitely was. This band ripped its collective heart out to the sound of a machine whirring in sequence. This final release gives a last shot of Hoover as they walk out. The songs are all previously released from compilations and out of print records. The re-recorded versions were finished in 1997, and the LP reads “Intended For Documentation Only,” so don’t get those hopes up for a reformed Hoover. It would be impossible to pick favorites, each song is immaculate in it’s own way. “TNT,” the opener, rocks out with it’s comment on crime, “Everybody’s got a gun in the city/I want mine too/you want to play games/I want to play war… .” “Breather Resist” from the Old Glory compilation is Hoover at it’s dynamic best, while “Relectolux” shows the penchant for allowing space to flow in it’s music. This one is a good investment and well worth the time. Slowdime, P.O. Box 414, Arlington, VA 22210


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