Event Reviews

Slam Fest

with Speedload, Kluge, Kryptdaddys, Bad Apple, T.J. Hookers

The Hustler, Indialantic, FL • 5.2.98

I missed the first three bands, but I’ve seen Speedload many times and can recommend them with without reservation – they kick ass! Heard great things about Kluge. Kryptdaddys played a great set. They have an awesome attitude and great energy on stage. I heard a rumor that this might have been their last show. Hope that’s not true, ‘cause they rock! The biggest surprise of the night had to be the long anticipated debut of Bad Apple, the latest project from ex-Aggression bassist Jelly Roll. I had been expecting good things after hearing a pre-release copy of their new album, but I was not prepared for the ass-whooping Bad Apple gave the Hustler this night! After enduring the mosh assault up front for the first few numbers, I headed back to see an ocean of slack jaws and wide eyes. Bad Apple killed, plain and simple. Left with the unenviable role of following them were T. J. Hookers from Jacksonville Beach. They managed to turn an initially unenthusiastic crowd into believers with their high-energy old school style. A great bunch of guys as well, I hope they come back soon. A great party at my favorite place, Slam Fest was an event to remember. ◼


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