Music Reviews

The Rah Bras

Concentrate to Listen to the Rondo that We Christen King Speed

Lovitt

Barbarous. Tribal. Primitive. Savage. Punk as fuck. Words like this are what comes to mind when I listen to “FYC,” the opening track on Concentrate. This isn’t the music the cannibals play as they soak you in giant pots, building a heaping pile of firewood underneath each cauldron. It’s the last thing you hear, the fevered pitch, the frantic chanting, the scrape of stone knifes being sharpened. Fuck. Good thing it’s short.

The Rah Bras continue with a crazed collection of intensely rythmic and inventive tunes. Ranging from Missing Foundation to Brainiac, there are no limits to the harshness these folks can harness into catchy tunes. Ominous chords amongst the funky drums and sexy repetition of “The Fifth Allen.” The buzzing bouncing hive music of “Nasty, Freak” Alternating boredom and unblushing rudeness in “Bus Stop.” And more.

This is what bands of the new milllenium should be playing. Enough recirculation of popular culture. Let’s try something new. Lovitt Records, P.O. Box 248, Arlington, VA 22210


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