Music Reviews

Cheater Slicks

Skidmarks

Crypt

As the Slicks get slicker with every studio release, more and more of the original rawness that defined this gut-buster group seems to be getting lost. Skidmarks treads back to the initial synthesis of the Slicks and is the definitive release thus far, dragging you back to their debut album and early demos and then onto some choice live radio broadcasts. (The more live feel of the WMBR broadcasts really captures the thunder of how this brand of sonic sludge should be heard.) Skidmarks has a real Flipper-esque feel to it- more so than you’d think from a punk rhythm an’ blues band- as if alcohol was abused more as a psychedelic than a depressant. Let’s face it- any band that still has the balls to blast out a song whose sole Iyric is screaming “Murder” fuckin’ deserves all the homage we can muster in ‘98. If you buy one Cheater Slicks disc, buy two copies of this one – one to listen to and one to lose in a stupor. Crypt USA, 1250 Long Beach Avenue #101, Los Angeles, CA 90021


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