Music Reviews

NRG Ensemble

Bejazzo Gets A Facelift

Atavistic

Man, this is a really awesome and powerful album. It shows how a “free” sounding project can be the most violent tempest in the world, or be chilling relaxation. And then there’s just great arrangements, great playing, and great fucking jazz.

Mars Williams and Ken Vandermark on the horns, Kent Kessler and Brian Sandstrom on the double basses, and Steve Hunt on the percussion. All this and some extra instruments with channel separation (certain players on the right, others on the left), and a deep envelope of music to be played!

Bejazzo Gets A Facelift: you’ll groove to it, you’ll become frightened by it, you’ll want to sleep to some cuts, you’ll want to rise with others, you’ll want to dance and laugh, listen and think. And you will think and I swear you will find yourself feeling smarter each time you listen to the album. And even though they’re so powerful and out, they’re all very easy to enjoy.

Improvisations de insanity, whirling post modern bop, sirens’ ballads, sound effects and lyrical “noise,” and just rich full bodied music. NRG Ensemble is incredible, and Bejazzo Gets A Facelift will knock you down if you don’t believe it. Atavistic, P.O. Box 578266, Chicago, IL 60657; http://www.atavistic.com


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