Music Reviews

Rabbit’s studio tracks and remixes have been the type of recordings that both DJs and consumers alike have sought with a conviction rarely seen in late ’90s post-indie/electronica movements. They are perhaps the biggest underground act that the mainstream public has never heard of.

In anticipation of their studio LP, Remixes Volume One ought to quell the insatiable urges while making available some of their more obscure mixes to a public that seems to be aching for a much needed `alternative’ to the schwag being pushed. The Lunasol mix of “Fear” by Sarah McLachlan appears instead of the musically harder, “Possession” by RITM. Their blockbuster hits with Humate & RITM, “East, The Opium Den Mix” and Goldie’s “Inner City Life,” Garbage’s “Queer,” Orbital’s “Are We Here?” and even a mix done for White Zombie, “Blood, Milk & Sky” are included.

Of the nine tracks included, the three lesser-known mixes for TDF, Velocity and Astral Pilot are equally important. In fact they come off as powerful and worthy of floorplay even years after their initial release. It only proves that not only are RITM masters of their craft but visionaries in a unique time and place that will be remembered long after the trend subsides and the money-chasing promoters and such have fled like lemmings towards the next musical cliff. Rabbit In The Moon are the most notorious breakbeat act in all of underground dance culture. Hear for yourself why they are Florida’s most cherished export. I can’t help but think that it’s been a long time coming. Too much respect.


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