Music Reviews

Deeper Concentration

Volume 2

Om

As if you needed more proof that hip-hop was a radically mutable, progressive musical form, Deeper Concentration comes to drive the point home in your earholes again. As Volume Two of the Deep Concentration series, the album features both up-and-coming DJs in the world of turntablism as well as a sampling of the contemporary masters of the art. Highlights include DJ Spooky’s illbient groove, “Murder by Syntax” which, together with rappers Organized Konfusion, explores the darker side of the world of beats. Also very impressive is the track “Madhattan Bound” by DJ Ming & FS. Representing a style they call Junkyard, the pair mixes up hip-hop, jungle, and breakbeats into one urban aural stew. A couple cuts fall short of the mark, however. The most surprising is X-ecutioner master DJ Rob Swift’s “The Age of Television.” Despite his extraordinary skills, the scratching of soundbites from 1950’s television shows over the groove strips the funk out of the mix. Nevertheless, Deeper Concentration has enough artistry and innovation to become a classic of turntable science. All that scratchin’s makin’ me itch! OM Records, 245 S. Van Ness, San Francisco, CA 94103


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