Music Reviews

DJ Andy Smith

The Document

Phase 4

What a month for breaks! This kid’s off-the-wall release of his mixdown literally spans decades of musical terrain while remaining true to the mix. Incredibly, Smith mixes through tracks by the Jungle Brothers, the James Gang, Barry White, Grandmaster Flash, the Spencer Davis Group, Peggy Lee, Chic, Marvin Gaye and (gasp!) Tom Jones. Not a weak mix in the lot, and plenty of that off-the-decks “showboating” to boot. It just goes to show that a talented DJ capable of programming a set is never confined to one particular style or sound.

That’s the beauty of beat-driven tracks; they can all be cut up, mixed, walked or worked by a variety of methods and means to deliver a set of uncompromisingly delicious tones into one never-ending song. For those of you who want to turn that hard-edged chronic rock and roll friend onto the DJ’s craft this will do the deed. On The Document, Andy Smith’s time has arrived – welcome to the era of the DJ. If a mix like this doesn’t keep the peace at the party then you need some new friends. Very proper indeed.


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