Music Reviews

Twin Obscenity

For Blood, Honor and Soil

Century Media

“Imagine the impenetrable, dark Norwegian woods by night, when only frail streams of silver moonlight fall through to the ground. Animated by the creatures of the night, one can also picture hordes of ancient soldiers still riding on their war horses and desperately looking for a moment of rest in their never ending battle.” The drummer’s name is Knut. What else can I say? The name of this album sounds familiar for some reason. Maybe because I used to have band called (for blood in the stool… ), and if you say it with a really heavy, Norwegian accent, the two pretty much sound the same. That’s cool! A really interesting thing about this music: every once and while, this ethereal voice comes in that sounds like that lady who sang for David Lynch. But then it cuts back to the lead singer in one of those guy-managing-to-get-out-3-more-syllables-just-before-he’s-choked-to-death type voices… “Fuck you (wheeze) I’ll never tell you where I hid the (cough) key! You’ll never have time (gasp) to get out of the ship before (choke) the auto-self-destruct-bomb-thing detonates!” Or like Anakin Skywalker, “Tell your sister… (hack)… you were righhhhhhh… t..” Century Media, 1453-A 14th St., Suite 324, Santa Monica, CA 90404; http://www.centurymedia.com


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