Music Reviews

The Cuffs

Bottoms Up

Radical

I have no problem adding to my growing list of the best punk rock albums of the decade, in fact, I feel tremendously encouraged when serious great punk rock comes my way. Thusly, I hereby add the Cuffs’ Bottoms Up to the list.

Looking at the band’s photos, I’d say they’re just a couple of years older than Hanson, but somehow they packed the right kind of music into their lives so far. Their sound is loud, totally melodic, mean punk rock and Oi! directly linked to the old (?) bands of the early 1980s, like the (yes) Misfits, Kraut, Black Flag, and Minor Threat (and more, I’m sure). That’s some awesome company I’m likening the Cuffs to, but, believe me, they deserve it.

There’s great marching, anthemic punk songs like “John L. Sullivan,” “Getting Smashed,” “March On,” and “Punk’s Not Dread.” And classic, lift your head to the sky punk like “No More,” “Red, White, and Blue” (a great, quick instrumental, like the Clash’s “Listen”), “Vision,” and “When the Sun Goes Down.” I mean, this is music that’s punk through to the bones, man, the kind that makes you want to fight back against the bullshit of society. Punks of all ages who are still punk to the end should be proud that new bands like the Cuffs are playing great punk rock. Radical Records, 77 Bleeker Street, Suite C2-21, New York, NY 10012


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