Music Reviews

Autechre

LP5

Warp/Nothing

To say I’ve been looking forward to this release for awhile would be an understatement. But was it worth it? Oh yes. Autechre doesn’t understand the notion that groups can have “off” albums. Instead, they are playing a game of leapfrog with themselves by outdoing themselves ten-fold with every release. They aren’t just outdoing themselves. They are progressing into the future faster and farther with every release. Tri Repetae, for me, was one of the most mind altering and innovative things to come into my hands. I’ve had it for about two years (sorry I didn’t get it right away), and it still manages to make its way into my CD player several times a week. LP5 is similar to Tri Repetae only in its ability to challenge the listener. You have to follow closely and carefully to the sounds, rhythms, and structure to find the united beat. Once you find it, you are propelled down a path of enlightenment and understanding about how things shift and change over the course of listen. What I have found to be the most beautiful part of LP5 is its unique ability to tell a different story depending on your mood and what you are focusing your attention towards. Pick it up, and when they hit the US to tour, you have got to check them out. Interscope Records, 10900 Wilshire Blvd. #1230, Suite 1230, Los Angeles, CA 90024


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