Event Reviews

Black-Eyed Peas

Central Florida Fairgrounds • 7/30/99

With the exception of Ice “MotherFu**ing” T, Black-Eyed Peas were the only band representing hip-hop at this stop. Cypress Hill had recently dropped out to work on their new album. This did not deter the band from blowing up with raps at the speed of light and killer backup musicians, a DJ, and vocalist Kim Hill blending in the mix.

Having gotten national attention from the Bullworth soundtrack with the bouncy “Joints & Jam,” their act has become more visible, with constant touring for their CD, Behind the Front . They certainly were well-received by the crowd as the grooves pumped through the fairgrounds. Each of the three Peas took turns jawing at the crowd—“Make some fu**ing noise” was the chant of choice. Trading raps like passing a joint, Will.i.am, Apl.de.ap, and Taboo went off with a more forceful and hardcore approach than the album’s smooth grooves. Not that anyone was complaining when they busted out “Head Bobs” or “Falling Up.” As an added treat, each member took the spotlight and did a solo breakdance variation that got the crowd even more frenzied. It was nice to see a group rise to the occasion amidst the punk backdrop. Black-Eyed Peas are for real, and their Warped presence proved it. ◼


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