Music Reviews

The Moves

The Moves

Mr. Lady

Mr. Lady is rapidly becoming one of the more interesting labels around. This small, lesbian-run label was formed to promote and distribute women’s music and video projects. They boast a talent roster including the likes of Le Tigre (featuring Kathleen Hannah), Sarah Dougher, the Butchies, and Northhampton, Massachusetts’ own the Moves. The Moves play a dense semi-punk sound firmly rooted in a classic rock foundation. You can catch bits of Chuck Berry and Eric Clapton in the guitars and can hear Patti Smith and Heart floating through the vocals, but these girls have crafted a sound all their own. They border on being deconstructionists without ever turning their listens off. They walk that tightrope between pop and noise very nicely. They have also managed to carve out a sound markedly different from the Olympia/Portland sound made so prominent by Sleater-Kinney. The Moves are just another in a growing list of good records from Mr. Lady.

Mr. Lady Records, PO Box 3189, Durham, NC 27715; http://www.mrlady.com


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